FCSB2008

International Workshop on Future Challenges for Systems Biology

4-6 Feburary 2008 @ Tokyo International Forum , Tokyo, Japan 

Program

Theme I: What are design principles behind biological systems? Day 1
Theme II: A paradigm shift in medicine Day 2 & Day 3


Theme I: What are design principles behind biological systems?

If systems biology to offer solution to drug industry stagnation or to significantly improve medical practice, in depth knowledge of biological system is essential Theme of the day focus on finding “logic behind biological systems” that leads to understanding of design principles. Not only specific instance of interactions and molecules, we wish to discuss what are logics and architectures behind biological systems. Also, we wish to discuss how can we exploit our understanding to medicine by finding a way to effectively control the system.

Theme II: A paradigm shift in medicine

Progress in high-throughput measurements and systems biology is now revealing complex and dynamic nature of biological systems. Structure of networks and their properties, such as robustness and fragility, impact successes and failures of drugs. At the same time, pharmaceutical industries are in deep trouble. Despite almost tripled increase in R&D expenditure in pharmaceutical companies, their pipeline is drying up. This may caused by single-molecular target approach that has less consideration on biological networks. Reality that we have to face is that biological systems are awfully complex network of evolutionary optimized systems. This implies a need for drastic paradigm shift from molecular-centered view to network or system-centered view of biological systems. This theme discusses needs and prospects for paradigm shift in medicine and drug design.


⇒ abstracts

DAY 1:

9:30-9:45: 
Opening: 
Fumiaki Takahashi (Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST))
9:45-10:30 
Opening Perspective talk: 
Inter-sphere systems science: Scaling systems biology to mitigate global crisis
 
Hiroaki Kitano (The Systems Biology Institute and Sony Computer Science Laboratories, Inc)

Day 1 Session 1

Chair: Huaiyu Mi (SRI International, USA)

Theme I: What are design principles behind biological systems?

If systems biology to offer solution to drug industry stagnation or to significantly improve medical practice, in depth knowledge of biological system is essential Theme of the day focus on finding “logic behind biological systems” that leads to understanding of design principles. Not only specific instance of interactions and molecules, we wish to discuss what are logics and architectures behind biological systems. Also, we wish to discuss how can we exploit our understanding to medicine by finding a way to effectively control the system.


10:30-11:00
Architecture and robustness of yeast signaling
Stefan Hohmann (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)

11:00-11:30
Mapping the global sensitivity of cellular network dynamics: sensitivity heat maps, a new global summation law and applications to network estimation and experimental design
David Rand (University of Warwick, UK)

11:30-12:00
Towards biological control theory at cellular level
Reiko Tanaka (RIKEN)

12:00-12:30
In vivo robustness analysis of eukaryotic cell division cycle using genetic tug-of-war method
Hisao Moriya (PRESTO/JST, Cancer Institute)

12:30-14:00 Lunch

Day 1 Session 2

Chair: Mike Hucka (California Institute of Technology, USA)

14:00-14:30
Towards a virtual plant root
Nick Monk (University of Nottingham: BBSRC Centre)

14:30-15:00
Cooperative regulation of signaling and transcription in ErbB receptor-expressing cancer cells 
Mariko Hatakeyama (RIKEN Genome Sciences Center, Japan)

15:00-15:30
The logic of the eukaryotic cell cycle
Bela Novak (University of Oxford, UK)

15:30-16:00 Break

Day 1 Session 3

Chair: Stefan Hohmann (University of Gothenburg, Sweden)

16:00-16:30
Networks of maintenance and repair: systems biology of ageing and longevity
Jennifer Hallinan & Tom Kirkwood (New Castle, BBSRC Centre)

16:30-17:00
Machine Learning Biological Pathways
Stephen Muggleton (Imperial College, London UK: BBSRC Centre)

17:00-17:30
PANTHER Pathway Database
Huaiyu Mi (SRI International, Menlo Park, CA, USA)

17:30-18:00
Standardization efforts for the representation and exchange of computational models
Michael Hucka (California Institute of Technology, USA)

18:00-18:30
BBSRC Support for Systems Biology Research
Colin Miles (BBSRC, Molecular Cell Biology)

19:00-20:30
Reception @ Royal Cafeteria B1 of Tokyo Int'l Forum

DAY 2:

Theme II: A paradigm shift in medicine

Progress in high-throughput measurements and systems biology is now revealing complex and dynamic nature of biological systems. Structure of networks and their properties, such as robustness and fragility, impact successes and failures of drugs. At the same time, pharmaceutical industries are in deep trouble. Despite almost tripled increase in R&D expenditure in pharmaceutical companies, their pipeline is drying up. This may caused by single-molecular target approach that has less consideration on biological networks. Reality that we have to face is that biological systems are awfully complex network of evolutionary optimized systems. This implies a need for drastic paradigm shift from molecular-centered view to network or system-centered view of biological systems. This theme discusses needs and prospects for paradigm shift in medicine and drug design.

Day 2 Session 1

Chair: Hiroaki Kitano (SBI & Sony CSL)


9:15-10:00: Key Note Speech 1
Challenges and Opportunities for Drug Discovery and Systems Biology: A Perspective
Adriano Henney (AstraZeneca, UK)

10:00-10:45 Key Note Speech 2
Targeting the Networks: The Paradigm Shift in the Life Sciences
Hans Westerhoff (U. Manchester, UK)

10:45-11:15 Break

Day 2 Session 2

Chair: Hans Westerhoff (University of Manchester, UK)

Session: What is future approach for drug design?

11:15-11:45 
Systems Biology and the Multi-Node Drug Target
Joseph Lehar and Alexis Borisy (CombinatoRX Incorporated, Cambridge, MA USA)

11:45-12:15
Systems biology: From today's impact to tomorrow's paradigm shift 
Alex Bangs (Entelos)

12:15-14:00 Lunch

Day 2 Session 3

Chair: Sang Yup Lee (KAIST)

14:00-14:30
MCISB, SYSTEMS BIOLOGY AND THE DIGITAL HUMAN
Douglas Kell (Manchester, UK: BBSRC Centre)

14:30-15:00
A quantitative understanding of dynamic cellular processes during detoxification in human hepatocytes (Research network within the German HepatoSys Project)
Matthias Reuss (University Stutgart, Germany)

15:00-15:30
Integrated Data Analysis of Host and Pathogen Genomes – Mining for Antimicrobial Mechanisms and Targets
Chris Rawling (Rothamsted Research) 

15:30-16:00 Break

Day 2 Session 4

Chair: Edda Klipp (Max Plank Institute)

16:00-16:30 
Systems Approaches to Target Identification in Type 2 Diabetes - An Area of Unmet Medical Need
Frank Doyle (UCSB: USA, Diabetes) and Preston Hensley (Pfizer)
* Presented by Preston Hensley 

16:30-17:00
Connecting the dots in diabetes pathogenesis: the need for systems biology
Pierre De Meyts (Novo Nordisk, Denmark)

17:00-17:30
Metabolite essentiality and its use in system-wide identification of drug targets
Sang Yup Lee (KAIST, Korea)

17:30-18:30
Discussions

DAY 3:

Theme II: A paradigm shift in medicine (cont.)

Day 3 Session 1

Chair: Marta Cascante (University of Barcelona)

9:15 – 9:45
Systems Biology - The need for success stories
Igor Goryanin (University of Edinburgh, UK) 

9:45-10:15
Systems Approaches to identifying new drug targets in tuberculosis
Johnjoe McFadden (School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, UK)

10:15-10:45 Break

Day 3 Session 2

Chair: Igor Goryanin (University of Edinburgh)

10:45-11:15
Network-based drug target prediction
Edda Klipp (Max Planck Institute for Molecular GeneticsBerlin, Germany)

11:15-11:45
Multiple perturbations on cancer cell metabolic pathways as new targets for novel designed therapies
Marta Cascante* (Universitat de Barcelona-IBUB (Institute of Biomedicine University of Barcelona)

11:45-12:15
High-resolution Cell-based Screening Microscopy
Zvi Kam (Weizmann Inst., Israel)

12:15-14:00 Lunch

Day 3 Session 3

Chair: Pierre de Meyts (Hagedorn Research Institute)

14:00-14:30
High-precision Drug Screening with a Petaflops Special-Purpose Computer
Makoto Taiji (RIKEN)

14:30-15:00
Temporal coding of ERK signaling networks
Shinya Kuroda (U-Tokyo/CREST, Japan) 

15:00-15:30
Chemical and pathway proteomics for a postgenomic pharmacology
Giulio Superti-Furga (Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Science)

15:30-16:00
Technical challenges of chemical proteomics for stimulating medicinal chemists and enhancing signal transduction researches
Yoshiya Oda (Univ. Tokyo) 

16:00-16:30 Break

16:30-18:00
Discussion Session: Medical Innovations by Systems Biology

18:00 
Closing
Hiraoki Kitano (SBI & Sony CSL)